Tag Archives: California gas tax

There’s still time to sign the gas tax repeal petition – tell your friends!

23 Mar

I hope more people will yak up this gas tax repeal effort – I just sent a letter to both local papers. It only took me about 45 minutes from start to finish – and I had pots on the stove.

It didn’t take very long for the 2018 gas tax and car registration increase to affect our quality of life – I’ve already noticed higher prices on staple groceries. Today the news confirmed as much  – Yoplait and Cheerios are up in price,  “due to transportation costs”. 

This tax increase has no “low income subsidy” –  poor families will pay a higher percentage of their income, just to get to work and buy food.  

Gas tax proponents claim the money will go to fix roads, but according to the San Diego Tribune, only half the money would be dedicated to traffic infrastructure, “The other half of the money would be spent largely at the discretion of local municipalities on a variety of projects.”  

The city of Chico already receives gas tax from the state, as well as over a million dollars a year in “franchise fees” from PG&E, Comcast, and Waste Management, for use of city streets, and look at the condition of our streets. 

California registered voters can still  sign the gas tax repeal petition that is being circulated by “Reform California”.  Signature gatherers have been working at Chico Safeway stores.  You can also download the petition to print, sign and send in at http://www.reformcalifornia.org/

Juanita Sumner, Chico CA

 

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Is too much of your money is being spent at the “discretion” of others? Half the new gas tax to be spent “at the discretion of local municipalities…”

8 Mar

It looks like the gas tax repeal has made the ballot, and good for that.  Now we’re hearing, only half the money from the new gas tax was intended for road repairs, the rest could be spent “at the discretion of local municipalities…”   Ask yourself, when was the last time the road in front of your house was properly surfaced? How many sewer hook-ups with crappy patch jobs, how many crews pouring slobbers in pot holes that end up all over the underside of your car?

How about that $385,000 remodel on city of Chico council chambers? That was tacked on to your Comcast bill.  Are you sick of “discretionary spending” yet?

From the San Diego Union Tribune, January 18:

http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/environment/sd-me-gas-tax-20180118-story.html

So where is the money going?

Roughly half of the revenue from the increased gas taxes and vehicle registration fees, about $26 billion in the next decade, would go to transportation infrastructure maintained by the state. That includes about $1.8 billion a year for the highway system.

The other half of the money would be spent largely at the discretion of local municipalities on a variety of projects, predominantly related to road maintenance but also improvements to transit, bike and pedestrian infrastructure. About $1.5 billion annually is projected for repairs to local streets and roads.

And get aload of the carrots they’re waving in front of us!

The state is also planning to roll out annually about $25 million for freeway patrols for stranded motorists on the most heavily congested freeways, $25 million in local planning grants and $5 million in workforce training.

Right – cops won’t even do traffic control or come to the scene of an accident unless there’s a major injury, you really believe they will do freeway patrols for stranded motorists? And here’s two more lies gas tax proponents just keep repeating:

With the taxes and fee hikes, Californians will pay an extra $10 a month on average, according to the state Department of Transportation. A legislative analysis found that drivers currently spend roughly $700 a year fixing their cars due to poor roads.

First of all, it will be more than $10 a month between increased gas prices and the hike in registration. Second, how many of you are paying $700 a year to fix road damage on your cars? 

Governor Moonbeam has lied to us before – for one thing, he told us he would not raise taxes without voter approval, and then he went right to the back door of the capital building with this gas and registration tax. He also told us the sales tax increase would be temporary, and that it would keep college tuition down – both lies.

Public workers have become The New One Percent, and they like it. They aren’t going to let go easily. 

The Buck Stops Here – sign the gas tax petition

11 Feb

I printed out a copy of the gas tax repeal petition, signed it, and mailed it in Thursday, I hope you will do same.

http://act.reformcalifornia.org/petitions/cartax/html/gen/

I am not contributing money to the effort but figure two more signatures – including my husband’s – will not hurt. 

Reform California is trying to get the tax measure onto the November ballot. Of course that’s a crap-shoot – what if the voters, heavily bent with public employees, pass it? Ever wonder what proportion of our population is public workers who  benefit from tax increases? Just ask Google!

http://www.governing.com/gov-data/public-workforce-salaries/states-most-government-workers-public-employees-by-job-type.html

This data is from the 2014 Census figures. Read the intro – education employees are separated out, the first number you see – 883,408 – is just state, county, and city workers. Scroll down to “Public Employment by Job Classification” to see school workers by state – select California. That’s another 633,301 for a total of over 1.5 million full time, pensioned public workers. 

Also according to the US Census Bureau, the population of California was between 37 and 39 million in 2014, and about 23 percent of those people were under 18, unable to vote. Last year the LA Times reported 18.2 million registered voters in California.

http://www.latimes.com/politics/essential/la-pol-sac-essential-politics-updates-there-are-now-more-registered-voters-in-1475694802-htmlstory.html

So, 1.5 million voters in that pool does not sound like much, until you take into account – how many voting dependents/relatives do these people have? 

It’s hard trying to predict what the voters will do. Will they even vote, is the question. 

I hate sitting back and waiting, so I try to act. Signing the petition made me feel empowered, as if I was doing something. I think others will act too, if they feel the effort will lead to something bigger. Overturning the gas tax is not only good for our wallets, it’s a strike against the outrageous and dangerous overspending that has become Business as Usual for California and much of the nation. 

My dad had a hat he liked to wear – it said, “The Buck Stops Here.” 

 

 

Gas tax petition gaining momentum – time to defund the special interest programs that are ruining our state

24 Jan

I’m glad I went to that meeting yesterday, because it relates to some other stuff I’ve been reading in the news. 

First of all, Dude sent me this article over a week ago:

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-jackson-california-poverty-20180114-story.html

“Guess which state has the highest poverty rate in the country? Not Mississippi, New Mexico, or West Virginia, but California, where nearly one out of five residents is poor. That’s according to the Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure, which factors in the cost of housing, food, utilities and clothing, and which includes noncash government assistance as a form of income.”

I’ll buy that, because that’s what I’m seeing all around me – more than 1 in 5 of my friends are having money problems, and few of them have been living fast or fancy – they’re having a hard time paying their new PG&E, Cal Water, and Waste Management rates, which are going up hell-bent-for-leather compared to their wages. My kids are working jobs at reduced hours because their employers cannot afford to pay the still-required health care premiums for employees working 28 hours or more a week. 

While you might want to blame welfare recipients, read on:

“Self-interest in the social-services community may be at fault. As economist William A. Niskanen explained back in 1971, public agencies seek to maximize their budgets, through which they acquire increased power, status, comfort and security. To keep growing its budget, and hence its power, a welfare bureaucracy has an incentive to expand its “customer” base. With 883,000 full-time-equivalent state and local employees in 2014, California has an enormous bureaucracy. Many work in social services, and many would lose their jobs if the typical welfare client were to move off the welfare rolls.”

And then there’s the pressure on the middle income families who have to drive to work – The Moonbeam’s answer to poverty was higher taxes on cars and gas.  There’s no limit when you are spending other people’s money. Luckily a group has come up with a gas tax repeal petition:

http://act.reformcalifornia.org/petitions/cartax/html/gen/

From the San Diego Union Tribune:

http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/business/energy-green/sd-fi-gastax-repeal-20171127-story.html

“We need to stop the car and gas tax hikes because, number one, it’s hurting working families,” said Carl DeMaio, a former member of the San Diego City Council and now a talk radio host who has helped spearhead the repeal. “Secondly, the money is being diverted time and time again from road repairs and road expansion to any special interest project the politicians have.”

 

Yes, any special interest project – like a busline to Sacramento that  takes an hour longer than driving your car, that will still cost $24 round trip (and screw you if you miss that 4:55 bus), and will still have to be 60 percent subsidized by the taxpayers, even if they get the ridership required by the grant program. 

Read this again, “With 883,000 full-time-equivalent state and local employees in 2014, California has an enormous bureaucracy.”

Including the staffers at BCAG, SRTA, SJJPD, and a bunch of other special districts around the state. BCAG has a $1.5 million dollar payroll to meet, for 12 staffers – whipping out my handy calculator, I see that’s $125,000 per staffer. 

Public compensation drives up the cost of everything, from housing to food to gas to daycare to medical care and so on.  The private sector family living on $40,000 or less has to compete with these people for homes, groceries, everything – in a town with so many publicly employed residents as Chico, the seller or merchant is able to charge top dollar for everything.

This is how these stupid special projects affect our quality of life. Tell your county supervisor you don’t want to participate in this bus line to nowhere, it’s not too late, the grant applications haven’t been accepted yet.